Meghan Markle’s divorce is dealt with according to Archbishop of Canterbury

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, has confirmed that ahead of her wedding to Prince Harry, Meghan Markle’s divorce has been “dealt with” in the same way that it would be with any other couple. The Archbishop of Canterbury is set to officiate at the couple’s wedding at St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle in May.

Commenting on whether Meghan Markle’s previous marriage was an issue, Justin Welby said, “It’s not a problem. The Church of England has clear rules for dealing with that and we’ve dealt with that. We went through that as anyone would who will officiate at a wedding where someone has been separated and a partner is still living.”

Justin Welby was ordained in 1992 after a 15-year career in the oil industry. His first 15 years with the Church were spent in the Coventry diocese and in 2002 he was made Canon of Coventry Cathedral where he jointly led its international reconciliation work. From 2007-2011 he was Dean of Liverpool Cathedral and Bishop of Durham from 2011-2012.

In 2012, Justin Welby became the 105th Archbishop of Canterbury. In his installation as Archbishop at Canterbury Cathedral in 2013, Justin Welby commented, “There is every possible reason for optimism about the future of Christian faith in our world and in this country.”

Meghan Markle married American film producer, Trevor Engelson, in 2011 though they filed for divorce in 2013 citing ‘irreconcilable differences’. In 2002 the Church of England agreed that divorced people could remarry in church, with the discretion of the priest.

Justin Welby, who has written a new book entitled ‘Reimagining Britain – Foundations for Hope’, was asked what Meghan Markle could bring to The Royal Family, “The wedding is going to be wonderful. I’m looking forward to it enormously.”

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle became engaged in November 2017 and are to marry at St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle on May 19th.

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