A British man on trial for encouraging Prince George attack

A British man has appeared in Woolwich Crown Court for the first day of a six-week trial after he encouraged fellow extremists to attack Prince George at school. It is reported that Husnain Rashid had created an ‘e-toolkit’ for radicalised followers which encouraged them, among other things, to poison batches of supermarket ice cream.

The court also heard that Rashid had posted details on the messaging service, Telegram, of Prince George’s school in Battersea with the message ‘not even The Royal Family is safe’. The message appeared alongside a photo of four-year-old Prince George.

The trial, which is to last for six weeks in London, makes clear from its preliminary investigations that Husnain Rashid was more than happy to target internationally recognised figures.

Annabel Darlow, part of the prosecution team, highlighted how dangerous Rashid could be, “His proposals were indiscriminate and made no distinction between adult and child, between members of fighting forces and civilians. He made numerous posts glorifying terrorist atrocities committed successfully against others and encouraging and inciting his readers to plan and commit more successful terror attacks of their own.”

Back in December 2016, Husnain Rashid wrote an online post praising the murder of football fans, just a day after an attack at the Besiktas Stadium in Istanbul which killed 38 people. He then subsequently posted a Wikipedia listing of UK stadiums by their capacity.

It was revealed in court that Rashid superimposed an image of two jihadists over a photo of Thomas’ School in Battersea, the school of Prince George. His atrocious message that accompanied this photo included the words ‘school starts early’.

Rashid also considered most public gatherings “fair game” including outdoor markets, festivals and political rallies and even listed detailed methods of murder including knives, homemade bombs, poison and vehicles.

The allegations against Husnain Rashid span a period between October 2016 and April 2018.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s